Summit County Art Forum: Current Exhibit

The Summit County Art Forum is a display space that showcases local art. The space is located in the upper level of the County Commons building in Frisco. The Art Forum rotates its exhibit three times each year, with each exhibit based on a particular theme.

The theme of the current exhibit is “Faces,” which will be on display through December 2016.

‘Faces’ Featured Artists

“Faces” speaks to the diversity of faces - human and otherwise - in Summit County. The exhibit features the work of 16 local artists.
Artists featured in Faces include Janelle Kopp, Linda Marr, Jordan Dobrin, Len Szmurlo, Jonathan Lerner, Nancy Wyatt, Jenise Jensen, Bill Linfield, Christina Davis, Bruce Spinney, Matt Lit, Adolph Zimmerman, Cecelia Eidemiller, Jeremy “Jerms” Green, the late Charles Des Moineaux and students from Snowy Peaks High School in Frisco.

Clay has been Janelle Kopp’s medium of choice since she first created a bust of her husband, Phil. “Telling a story is always my goal, whether working with human or animal figures,” Kopp said.

The beauty of the outdoors, people and animals serve as inspiration for Linda R. Marr, a former teacher. "Painting a specific individual or animal can be particularly challenging. I take many photos to capture special images,” Marr said.

Jordan Dobrin's travels have brought him to six continents. The Frisco resident believes the photographer and camera work in unison to memorialize an image. All his photographs are printed directly on metal.

Len Szmurlo’s preferred medium is wood - mostly Baltic birch. “With faces or portraits, the most difficult and challenging parts are the eyes: I always start with the eyes,” he said.

Jonathan Lerner’s photography runs the gamut from flowers to landscapes to portraits. His exhibited picture  of an old Dodge was digitized from a negative “when film was all we had.” The car reminded him of a face. “The old car always seemed happy there, and something about her spoke to me,” he said. 

Nancy Wyatt traveled around the country for almost 20 years selling original screen-printed designs on clothing. Now she runs two retail stores and a gallery in Frisco and loves to paint pet portraits. “These furry friends never let you down and are always eager to please and pose for photos,” she said.

Jenise Jensen has dabbled in a variety of artistic endeavors over the years, including fabric painting,  jewelry, tie dye and photography. Jensen says she is not a morning person, “but wildlife and people do not work around your schedule – you work around theirs.” So she‘ll get up at 5 a.m. to seek out a fox feeding at 6 a.m. 

Bill Linfield started with photographic film 40 years ago. He is a regular contributor to 9News and the Summit Daily News and often displays his work on canvas.

Christina Davis expresses herself with vivid colors and loves twisting and changing the reality of a scene. “I am just beginning to explore abstract painting and find it very exciting,” she said. “Seeing the world in just patterns, shapes and colors is challenging, yet fascinating.”

Silverthorne resident Adolph Zimmerman displays bronze sculptures. “I want to capture a moment in time with a sense of humor. I like to see people smile when they view my work,” he said.
Jeremy “Jerms” Green aims to express feeling through color. His paintings and wire sculptures are a “glimpse of time through the eyes of a survivor of a traumatic brain injury” he sustained at 16 years old.   

A retired teacher and school administrator, Bruce Spinney has become an avid angler and water color artist in retirement. He derives his inspiration from nature. “I find myself seeing the world differently now in terms of shape, color and contrast.”

Charcoal, pastel and oil painter Cecelia Eidemiller is known as the “fastest draw in the West” for her popular five-minute portrait profiles. The Breckenridge resident is also a prolific landscape artist.

Matt Lit is a photographer and teacher.  As a photojournalist, he’s shot out of a chopper, from airplanes and boats, hanging off rock walls and has taken a photo of a president. Now he focuses on teaching and dog photography.

Snowy Peaks High School students have created colorful masks on display in the Faces exhibit, curated by Yvonne Kuennen, who helps coordinate the art program for Snowy Peaks. 

The late Charles des Moineaux was an avid outdoorsman and artist, according to his son Leon Littlebird. “I watched him painting one day, and he said, ‘Every stroke of my brush is a prayer of gratitude to the beauty of nature.’” 

Leon Littlebird, a well-known songwriter and storyteller in Summit County, has roots in both pioneer and native cultures. At the opening of the Faces exhibit on Sept. 25, he will demonstrate his unique style when he shapes stories into a musical tapestry combining ancient flute music with captivating rhythms.

Photo of a painting of two dogs' faces.
Photo of a porcupine's face
Photo of an assortment of clay masks.
Photo of a koala